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Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a

Mars experience opens in the Wadi Rum desert

(CNN) — “Vast, echoing and God-like.” That is how T.E. Lawrence, the British archaeologist and army officer who inspired the 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia,” described Wadi Rum. As you approach the wind-swept mountains that fiercely jut out of the burnt orange sand in Jordan’s largest desert, it’s easy to see what he meant. The landscape here is like something from another world. So it’s perhaps no surprise that a